Everything is practice…

day3294-1-of-1

Day 329

Hooray! I’m current on my blog again, and I must admit that I feel complete relief as I post today’s second post (being behind on anything is tough for this perfectionist). I will also admit that I really struggled to come up with a topic for this post. I can usually produce at least one use-able photo each day, and if it’s interesting in any way, I can usually think of something to write about that photo’s subject. Coming up with a second photo and writing anything remotely interesting for a second time, well that folks, that is a completely different ball game.

That said, I decided to post a photo captured this morning while getting set-up for my moon shots. Let’s be honest, the photo is a bit of a hot mess, but it had a purpose, and it’s purpose was to help me get my tripod up and ready, ensure my remote shutter release was ready to go, and snap a few test shots before I switched lenses to attempt the moon shots. I honestly think I like this pic because it shows what happens to the moon (I swear it’s like photographing a great big flashlight) in your photos if you don’t understand the different metering modes (and when you would need/want to use them).

If you look closely at the moon in this shot, you’ll notice that it’s a very small bright white blur with zero discernible detail. It looks that way because when I took the shot I had my metering set to Evaluative Metering, which is usually a camera’s default meter setting, but in using that mode, I was telling my camera to read the lighting across the entire scene that I was shooting. Had I wanted to shoot the moon in this particular shot, (I would have first needed my telephoto lens ) I would have set my metering to Spot Metering, telling the camera to meter only around my selected focal point so as not to end up with a fully blown-out moon. Metering is something I’ve struggled with in conception and application, so finally getting my head around this feels really, really good…

This shot was taken with my Canon 6D, Canon 17-40mm lens with settings at .3s, f/20, ISO 400 (tripod and remote shutter release were used)

“Learning is the process whereby knowledge is created through the transformation of experience.” David A. Kolb

4 thoughts on “Everything is practice…

  1. spearfruit

    Very nice, honestly I don’t understand the whole concept of taking great pictures, but I do honestly know, YOU take beautiful pictures I enjoy viewing each day.

    Like

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